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May 21, 2019, 03:46 AM

Author Topic: Early 2000s  (Read 1225 times)

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Offline Kradie

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2019, 03:54 PM »
Teacher gets paid to teach, but this is a video game, you shouldn't get paid to show some form of decency to other humans. Sure, there times where I neglect and throw people away because their lack of linguistic skills, and some are just plain rude and don't give a shit. So in that regard, the reward of teaching is none, but sometime the payback is good, only if there is a recurring player who comes and enjoys your company and games. Which I experience in my Zar games.

I do agree a little bit with Komodo on Skunk leaning more to the elitist block. All starts from bottom and build themselves up, unlike Justin Bieber.

Most people think of the word ''selfish'' as a bad thing, but maybe it doesn't have to be a negative thing? We're all biological programmed to be selfish, so there's nothing wrong with it. We all gain something from one another by acting on our own intention. So in the end whatever you did can be defined as selfish, but it is the feeling you received from doing it that counts.


Offline TheKomodo

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2019, 04:18 PM »
We're all biological programmed to be selfish, so there's nothing wrong with it.

I couldn't possibly disagree with that more if I tried!

We are not biologically programmed to be selfish, we are taught to be selfish, and racist, and bigots, etc...

Kids naturally share with each other, and play and laugh with each other, they are full of curiosity, then as they grow it's the experiences that develop their minds and personalities, they copy things they see adults do and what they see on TV and their surrounding enviroment, and unfortunately what they see mostly turns them from innocent, caring, sharing, creative beings, into selfish, ignorant, racist, sexist etc. I am not saying everyone has their mind polluted, but most people unfortunately do.

Offline Kradie

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2019, 04:59 PM »
We're all biological programmed to be selfish, so there's nothing wrong with it.

I couldn't possibly disagree with that more if I tried!

We are not biologically programmed to be selfish, we are taught to be selfish, and racist, and bigots, etc...

Kids naturally share with each other, and play and laugh with each other, they are full of curiosity, then as they grow it's the experiences that develop their minds and personalities, they copy things they see adults do and what they see on TV and their surrounding enviroment, and unfortunately what they see mostly turns them from innocent, caring, sharing, creative beings, into selfish, ignorant, racist, sexist etc. I am not saying everyone has their mind polluted, but most people unfortunately do.

Yes, this is normal process of humans. We observe, copy, mimic, & innovate. Some of these processes can be seen as selfish. Act of doing good; Look at Jesus what he did, or other people that commits to good deeds. do you think it is all for pure goodness of their heart? Perhaps it is good, but something is to be gained unwillingly or not, the feeling of doing something good. Now It sounds like I'm talking it circles, but I do hope I make sense to some degree.

 If little boy sees mother do something good, boy wants to try that too, because the child recognize a good act passed down by mother and her approval.  Because of this, the child will remember, and use this good deed in the future for reward of feelings and whatnot.

Offline TheKomodo

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2019, 05:27 PM »
I do see where you are coming from, i've discussed that with Liam a few times, that there is no such thing as a selfless act because even donating, helping another human, makes us feel good, and it's the sensation of feeling good that we desire.

I do believe there is no such thing as a truly selfless act, in some form or another, you are doing it for honor, sacrifice, or something else, but the definition of selfish is more of a concern for ones own well-being alone, and a lack of consideration/tolerance for other beings.

So a choice between, feeling good but only helping yourself, and feeling good and helping multiple others, i'd choose the latter, everytime.

Offline l7cx1Cl

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2019, 07:38 PM »
hi var how r u, not sure if u knew me as MP or toxic, either way good to see old wermerz still alive ^.^

and hi skunk and komo  ;D
and... anu >.>


you produce dnb komo?

Why anu ">_>"? I don't hold grudges or negativity close to my heart. Any disagreements we had in the past are meaningless to me after a while. :D

Good to know 🙃 how have u been?
^
Right...
He still have me blocked cause I told him he's cringe! :)


🤔 I dont block people 😉
« Last Edit: March 08, 2019, 07:48 PM by l7cx1Cl »


Offline TheKomodo

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2019, 10:56 PM »
Hah thx it's actually my ipod 😏

Yo where can I listen ?  What daw u using?

Sorry I missed this.

Sure i've told you before lol, but I currently use Cubase 8.5.2 (legit).

https://soundcloud.com/komito-1

Offline l7cx1Cl

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2019, 01:23 AM »

nice dude I like sea star ^.^
this is my first attempt at DNB

https://soundcloud.com/nak4ma-psy/dnb-track-is-not-done


Offline TheKomodo

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2019, 03:53 PM »
What DAW are you using?

I kind of like the idea you are going for, the beat has an interesting groove, but the mixdown is, as expected, pretty noob.

I really like the intro, it has an interesting atmosphere to it.

The kickdrum/snare/hihats etc sound way over compressed to me, they sound very thin and weak, the hi hats aren't as weak as the drums but can still be improved.

The bass sounds quite weak as well, in contrast to the rest of the track it sounds ok, but the whole track itself sounds over compressed, lacks energy because of everything sounding thin.

Still, it's better than my 1st attempt at Drum & Bass lol.


Check this out:

https://www.musicradar.com/computermusic/computer-music-issue-214-ultimate-freeware-march-2015-615578

I used to buy a lot of the Computer Music Magazine issues back then because the guy I was learning from was an editor/contributor to the magazine, and I stumbled across this beauty.

If you scroll down you will come to "DnB TRACK-BUILDER", that specific tutorial was instrumental in learning how to do an authentic sounding mixdown, as well as how to make proper sounding DnB Drums.

If you purchase a copy of that issue, you can download the tutorial and the samples, even if you don't use the same DAW, you can translate everything it teaches into any DAW, and the best thing is, all the VSTs used are free! There are a couple of VSTs you will need to do your own research to find though, I managed to do it, i'm sure you can too :)

But definitely worth it if you are interested in learning DnB.

This track was made after copying the tutorial exactly, then changing/editing everything to my own taste, hence the name 214 Aftermath:

https://soundcloud.com/komito-1/komito-214-aftermath

This song got me on radio, and through that I made a few good friends in the scene, and I couldn't have done it without that tutorial :)



Offline Plutonic

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2019, 01:25 PM »
Any players from the early 2000's still around? I've bumped into oldsock and saltyk9. I know walrus is around too.  Hope to play with you guys soon, been a while.

I'd like to give a shout out to Sensei and his twitch interviews with old school wormers. I bumped into the interview from a link that bloopy posted in our WwA facebook group. From that interview I downloaded the game and trying to play a little bit when I have time. Thanks Sensei!

And Hello everyone.

Hey Var,

Don't really get a chance to play very often, but still keeping an eye on things around here :)

Offline l7cx1Cl

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2019, 12:43 AM »
What DAW are you using?

I kind of like the idea you are going for, the beat has an interesting groove, but the mixdown is, as expected, pretty noob.

I really like the intro, it has an interesting atmosphere to it.

The kickdrum/snare/hihats etc sound way over compressed to me, they sound very thin and weak, the hi hats aren't as weak as the drums but can still be improved.

The bass sounds quite weak as well, in contrast to the rest of the track it sounds ok, but the whole track itself sounds over compressed, lacks energy because of everything sounding thin.

Still, it's better than my 1st attempt at Drum & Bass lol.


Check this out:

https://www.musicradar.com/computermusic/computer-music-issue-214-ultimate-freeware-march-2015-615578

I used to buy a lot of the Computer Music Magazine issues back then because the guy I was learning from was an editor/contributor to the magazine, and I stumbled across this beauty.

If you scroll down you will come to "DnB TRACK-BUILDER", that specific tutorial was instrumental in learning how to do an authentic sounding mixdown, as well as how to make proper sounding DnB Drums.

If you purchase a copy of that issue, you can download the tutorial and the samples, even if you don't use the same DAW, you can translate everything it teaches into any DAW, and the best thing is, all the VSTs used are free! There are a couple of VSTs you will need to do your own research to find though, I managed to do it, i'm sure you can too :)

But definitely worth it if you are interested in learning DnB.

This track was made after copying the tutorial exactly, then changing/editing everything to my own taste, hence the name 214 Aftermath:

https://soundcloud.com/komito-1/komito-214-aftermath

This song got me on radio, and through that I made a few good friends in the scene, and I couldn't have done it without that tutorial :)




Cool ty ! Will check it out! Congrats on the radio.  My shit would be to dark for radio haha.  I'm underground for life🤣

And the vibe is more neurofunk or techstep
I really like deep dark music!   My main squeeze I'm creating in ableton is dark psytrance and dark progressive. Checj out zenon records.  This is the record label I WILL be on.  The CEO liked one of my tracks 😁

I made that little track in less than a hour. 
I had a project due the next day and just put a bunch of shit together.  Everyone liked it hah 😁And a buddy of mine helped with the intro

It's very noob!   Dnb iz hard dude!

But my wife that is a dnb junkie who DJ in berlin for dnb and techno for like 5years.   Really wants to make it.  And so we will evtnaully be make some wicked tunes.  We have been discussing on making a new genre that is dnb/psytrance

Wish we could collab ! 
Btw do u know of any places that sell templates?
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 12:47 AM by l7cx1Cl »


Offline TheKomodo

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #25 on: March 11, 2019, 02:18 PM »
I can't say much right now need to get ready for a train but just wanted to say, my stuff on radio isn't mainstream or anything, and it's free download, i'll never be like that ahaha!

Offline skunk3

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #26 on: March 13, 2019, 03:45 AM »
My 2 cents:

If you want to make it in the industry as a DJ or producer it basically has to be your life, and/or you have to be INCREDIBLY talented and have a unique style that sets you apart from the rest.

I've DJ'ed since high school and although I never really tried to 'make it' I know a few people who have... some who have made it and some who haven't but wanted to. Making it in DJ'ing completely depends on where you live. It is most competitive in Europe by far because you not only have to be technically skilled, but you need to be the whole package... producer, established label owner or artist, have your own style/taste, constantly keep up on new and older music, and be willing to travel and oftentimes work for free or less than what you deserve. These days you also need to have a squeaky clean social media record too because social justice warriors and internet trolls will tear you apart if they find anything at all. Also, as lame as it is, but being 'sexy' is also a plus.

It also depends on what you consider 'making it.' Do you want to play at local parties? Local clubs? Play at high end clubs? Play at festivals? Personally I think the festival circuit is trash because each DJ has maybe 2 hours to play so they don't take chances and don't have enough time to get really 'out there' and experimental. In the U.S. you're basically gonna be stuck playing local parties/weeklys/monthlys unless you live in a bigger city that actually has a 7-days-a-week sort of night life scene. You will also have to play for free a lot of the time because bar/club owners don't wanna pay anyone shit because for every one DJ who is worth their salt there are twenty other kids who have a laptop and some kind of Serato controller and a hard drive full of pirated MP3's. Also, most venues do not supply any sort of equipment at all aside from sound, and some places can't even supply sound... and if they do most of the time the sound system is garbage. I personally feel that playing a 1-2 hour set is a waste of time unless it's hip-hop. For dance/electronic music I want at LEAST 4 hours to play so I can take people on a journey. So keep in mind that if you are going to travel and DJ a bunch you have to deal with the logistics of transporting all of your stuff, which isn't a problem if you are going to play somewhere that is going to provide equipment but depending on your media of choice it can still be a pain. I prefer to play vinyl but transporting two turntables, a mixer, and a couple of crates of records is a pain in the ass... so sometimes I just bring a laptop and a Pioneer controller, or sometimes I will bring the decks but use control vinyl in conjunction with Serato or Rekordbox. These days I don't go out and play that much anymore because everyone wants to hear 'bass music' EDM these days and don't have the attention span or taste to enjoy actually deep, creative music.

DVS1 recently put out a video interview and he talked about the current state of DJ'ing and the difference between club/rave culture and festival culture and says that they are basically entirely different things and I agree with him. I hate festivals and DJ worship. DJ's need to be up in a booth, out of sight of the dance floor and the hype of an event needs to be based upon the quality of the sound system and location rather than 'so-and-so is gonna spin!'

As far as production goes, a lot of the aforementioned stuff still applies. These days EVERYONE is a 'producer.' There's even a million YouTube tutorials for every conceivable thing so even a total beginner can get up and running in no time. The problem with this glut of producers these days is that very few people are original and have their own sound and style. Everyone else just basically tries to emulate artists they admire, and poorly. Everyone buys sample packs (or pirates them) and everyone uses the same hot/new VST synths and the same presets because most people don't bother learning how to actually program a synthesizer aside from maybe tweaking a couple of parameters. People just focus on the mastering part of it because they want their crappy, cookie-cutter track to sound as 'professional' as possible even though it sucks. There are no interesting melodies and harmonies, no interesting chord changes or inversions, etc. It's just basic loops arranged and stacked. I know I'm sounding negative here but DJ'ing and production are really important to me even though I haven't actually finished a song of my own in several years now due to a lack of passion because of depression. I still buy and eventually sell all kinds of hardware bits of gear to learn them inside and out just because I like learning about the technology and become intimately familiar with the unique sonic characteristics of each thing. (Currently my 'toy of the hour' is the Analogue Solutions Telemark synthesizer.) That said, I am a music junkie and I'm constantly digging, buying vinyl, exploring Spotify, etc... and when it comes to newer independent music I get frustrated because so much of it is total shit. If it's not good enough to see a proper vinyl release on a decent label it's probably not worth my time.

tl;dr -

DJing: To make it you basically just need to put in a bunch of time playing for free and establishing yourself and your style. If you 'keep it real' and play more experimental sets you will likely not be as popular to crowds as other DJ's who play safe music choices, even if you are respected by the real music heads. To make a living DJ'ing you either have to sell out, be lucky, or have connections.

Producing: Making it as a producer is 10x as hard as making it as a DJ because it requires far more talent. My advice would be to not look for sample packs, stems, templates, etc. Just make whatever comes directly from your soul regardless of 'genre' or whatever. Tutorials for basic tips and techniques are fine but just be yourself. Good and interesting songwriting/composition is far more important than mastering polish. Also, it's good to at minimum have a decent mic for recording external sounds and voices because people who work 100% 'in the box' are missing an organic element... so record hand claps, DIY percussion, sounds, your own voice, etc. Read up on how recording sessions used to work before easy and cheap digital multitracking and get really good at playing an instrument. It doesn't matter which one, but you need to be good at at least one. Also, learn to sight read music instead of just randomly clicking scale-quantized notes into a grid on a DAW.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2019, 03:52 AM by skunk3 »

Offline TheKomodo

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #27 on: March 13, 2019, 02:02 PM »
To me, "making it big" in music is having your music well known and respected to the fans/artists/people in the genre you make.

I have no interest in becoming a social media obsessed DJ, or playing at gigs/festivals, I realized this a few years ago when I had a chance to pursue this path, it made me feel uncomfortable and awkward, and I realized I have to make music my way or not at all.

I don't believe to be successful is as hard as you make out, it's simple, you have to give/create something that many other people want to experience, if that is something new/unique and exciting, you have a much bigger chance, I soon realized I do not want to make the kind of music that most people enjoy, my music desires an acquired taste, I don't want to spend every waking hour making music because I have other interests and want to make the music I want to make regardless what people think about it, and like skunk says you need a squeaky clean social media page, and I am far too opinionated to be that successful, i'd end up spending every waking hour debating with people lol.

The problem is, what people actually want, in my opinion what people want kinda sucks... Like skunk said, I think being 'sexy' is quite important to being worldwide famous, which is my biggest dislike of the modern music industry, sex appeal, and most music focusing on the latest trends that change day to day, this is of course talking about mainstream music, the kind that makes people extremely rich and famous, it's all about looking good, feeling cool, but to me music is very spiritual, I don't even like lyrics, i'm all about the pure frequencies and sounds, harmony and adventure it takes you on.

Personally I believe if you love performing with every fibre of your being, you WILL find a way to make a career out of it, regardless of what anyone says, it might take a while but if you love if, it's the journey you enjoy, so time doesn't matter.

I will find continue to find success in music in my own way, I had interest from Nu Venture Records who said they enjoy my music, one of my favourite artists Rameses B has worked with them as well as Veela(an amazing, beautiful female vocalist), however they also said my style doesn't suit the style of their label, they would want me to produce stuff that sounds more mainstream/popular, and that didn't appeal to me, but it was amazing to get such positive feedback from people I greatly admire, to me, that is success because it was one of my personal life dreams/goals to be on that level, even though not everyone will agree :)


Offline Y2JID

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #28 on: April 15, 2019, 09:09 PM »
Sup var
Uh, yo, it just so happen this how Y2JID thing started
Flip two aces and get two face cards
It happens, chip stackin'
I turn around, see a bunch of chicks clappin'
But a girl walked by, caught my eye
So I said, 'What the fuck, stand here and give me luck'
And she whispered in my ear
A purple one on there and put a pink one on there

Offline Ytrojan

Re: Early 2000s
« Reply #29 on: April 27, 2019, 04:40 PM »
I don't give a crap if people play in leagues nor do I care what 'generation' they are from. I don't want to play with noobs, period. It's a waste of time.

There are many who share the same view as you, unfortunately that is why there are so many "noobs", and that is why less and less "skilled" players stick around.

Imagine, if education around the world ceased to exist, because teachers & experts around the world saw pupils & students as "noobs" and thought of engaging with and teaching them as a waste of time.

From the perspective of a noob, it is entirely possible that only a few encounters with such an impatient opinion as you have there can put someone off a game completely.

The human race is mostly selfish.
Yeah, this is how leagues die. If the WWF had fewer and fewer true superstars and more and more jobbers during the Attitude Era, I would be watching WCW every Monday Night. Not to mention, we should have PewDiePie play this game. The free promotion would help bring the 9-year-old army to this game, and those noobs eventually become pros[size=78%].[/size]
Imagine What a Buck Could Do!


I now declare a brand new league (and the successor to the failed Ultra League): WormsRF!